Carcass of partially-eaten shark washes up on New Smyrna Beach

Photos for Headline Surfer / This shark, with its tail missing, was found washed up on shore 10 a.m. Saturday at the New Smyrna Beach inlet in New Smyrna Beach, Florida.
YouTube video download /  Published on Jan 12, 2016: 10 Worst Shark Attack Beaches – These are the most deadliest and dangerous places in the world to go swimming. Sharks here could attack unprovoked and will eat anything! See where New Smyrna Beach ranks.
 
 
By HENRY FREDERICK 
Headline Surfer

NEW SMYRNA BEACH, Fla. -- Typically it's the shark that bites the human, but this time around, the carcass of a partially-eaten shark washed up on New Smyrna Beach over the weekend, a beach safety official said. 

"I have received numerous inquiries reference this,"  Senior Captain Tamra Marris of the Volusia County Beach Safety Ocean Rescue told Headline Surfer. "On Saturday at about 10 am at the New Smyrna Beach Inlet, we had a dead shark wash up on the beach that had a large chunk bitten out of it." 

She said It is unknown what type of predator bit the shark or how far offshore it was when it was bitten. 

"This is not too common but we do have a lot of species living in the ocean and the sick or injured do often wash up on the beach," Marris said describing it as either a black tip or spinner. Had the tail been intact it would have measured 5 feet in length. 

Black tip shark / Headline SurferSpinner shark / Headline Surfer"I have received numerous inquiries reference this,"  Senior Captain Tamra Marris of the Volusia County Beach Safety Ocean Rescue told Headline Surfer. "On Saturday at about 10 am at the New Smyrna Beach Inlet, we had a dead shark wash up on the beach that had a large chunk bitten out of it." 

She said It is unknown what type of predator bit the shark or how far offshore it was when it was bitten.

 "This is not too common but we do have a lot of species living in the ocean and the sick or injured do often wash up on the beach," Marris said describing it as either a black tip (shown at top) or spinner (shown below). Had the tail been intact it would have measured 5  feet in length. 

Black tips and spinners are typical kinds of sharks that mistake feet, ankles and hands of surfers for bait fish, typically letting go of a bite once they realize the difference.

FAST FACTS: Shark attacks on humans
• As has been the norm for decades, Florida in calendar year 2016, proportionately had most (60.4%) of the unprovoked attacks in the United States and the largest portion (39.5%) of the world’s total; both percentages higher than recent (2011-2015) averages of 49.2%, and 29.0% respectively.  The total of 32 Florida bites was a bit higher than the 2015 total of 30 and well above the recent five-year average of 23.8 (which included a recent record low of 11 in 2011), but did not approach the record high of 37 that occurred in 2000.  
• Volusia County had the largest number (15) of unprovoked incidents in the state.  The number of bites was notably higher than the its recent five-year average of eight attacks per annum but much lower than the record high of 22 such incidents in 2001.  The higher number of encounters in this central-east coast county is attributable to high aquatic recreational utilization of the area’s long and attractive beaches and waters by both Florida residents and tourists, including large numbers of surfers, and to the rich nature of its marine fauna.  
• Other Florida counties having bites were Duval (4), Brevard (3), St. Johns (3), Indian River (2), and Flagler, Lee, Palm Beach, Pinellas, and St. Lucie (1 each).  Outside of Florida, U.S. attacks were recorded in Hawaii (10), California (4), North Carolina (3), and South Carolina (2), with single reports in Texas and Oregon.  Hawaii and California totals were comparable the recent five year averages of eight and five per year, respectively.
• Significantly, worldwide there were only four fatalities resulting from unprovoked attacks, producing an uncommonly low fatality rate (4.9%). In addition to the two deaths in Australia, there were two fatalities in New Caledonia.  On average there were eight fatalities per year worldwide in the 2011-2015 period and six deaths per annum over the past decade.  These totals are remarkably low given the billions of human-hours spent in the water each year.  
• The long-term trend in fatality rates has been one of constant reduction over the past 11+ decades, reflective of advances in beach safety practices and medical treatment, and increased public awareness of avoiding potentially dangerous situations.  Notably, the U.S. had zero fatalities in 2016, likely in part a function of greater safety and medical capacity in areas of the U.S. where shark attacks historically occur.  This highlights the need for increasing efforts to improve beach safety, including educating the public about the risk of sharks, providing well-trained lifeguards, and advancing emergency medical care and medical capabilities in many areas of the world.
• As far as fatalities from shark attacks, in the US, Volusia County has never ad a fatality reported. In Southern California where great white sharks are known to frequent is typically the source of US shark attack fatalities. The majority of the shark attacks in Volusia County occur in New Smyrna Beach near the South Jetty because bait fish swim there and attract sharks.
Source: Shark Attack File at the University of Florida

 

Henry Frederick Picture

Short Bio

Henry Frederick is publisher of Headline Surfer®, the award-winning 24/7 internet news outlet in Daytona Beach, Florida, via HeadlineSurfer.com. Specializing in breaking news & investigative reporting, Frederick is among the Sunshine State's most experienced reporters with dozens of journalism-industry awards.

View his stories archives here