Daytona Beach seeking feedback on city's wayfinding signage

The overhead sign showcasing DaytonaBeach, FL on International Speedway Boulevard / Headline SurferThe overhead sign across International Speedway Boulevard adjacent to Daytona International Speedway is an example of significant wayfinding signage in the city that features the Great American Race -- the Daytona 500, and of course, the World's Most Famous Beach.

DAYTONA BEACH -- The city is seeking feedback on preliminary signage designs and list of venues for its wayfinding signage program, now in the second of three phases.

An open-house style meeting is 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, April 25, in the Rose Room at the Peabody Auditorium, 600 Auditorium Blvd.

More than 60 landmarks and destinations have been identified throughout Daytona Beach, said Susan Cerbone, spokeswoman or the municipality. She said landmarks include municipal buildings like courthouses and drivers’ license office, cultural venues; attractions and tourist destinations, shopping districts and parking lots.

City commissioners in August approved an agreement not to exceed $120,000 with Lassiter Transportation Group to produce a wayfinding master plan.

"The Daytona Beach-based consultant has inventoried the city’s landmarks and current signage and has documented code requirements for signage," Cerbone said. "The consultant concentrated on major roadways that serve as gateways into the city including I-95, I-4 and International Speedway Boulevard as well as city, county and state roads such as Beach Street, Main Street, Orange Avenue, Halifax Avenue, Peninsula Avenue, Mason Avenue and Ocean Avenue." 

For more information, please contact the Daytona Beach Public Works Department at 386-671-8607.

 

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Henry Frederick is publisher of Headline Surfer®, the award-winning 24/7 internet news outlet covering the Daytona Beach-Sanford-Orlando metro area via HeadlineSurfer.com since 2008. A longtime cops & courts reporter focused on breaking news & investigative reporting, Frederick is among the Sunshine State's most prolific daily news reporters, having amassed close to a hundred award-winning byline stories nearly evenly split in print and digital platforms. Frederick earned his Master of Arts in New Media Journalism with academic honors from Full Sail University in Winter Park in February 2019. He was a metro reporter with the Daytona Beach News-Journal for nearly a decade and then served as a city editor for the Taunton Daily Gazette in Taunton, Mass, while maintaining a residence in Central Florida. Prior to moving to Florida, Frederick was a metro reporter for the Rockland Journal-News in West Nyack, NY, for seven years. Headline Surfer was named the Sunshine State's top internet news site by the Florida Press Club in 2018.