Volusia County Beach Safety personnel deal with 8 rescues on Saturday; fly yellow flag

Dunlawton ramp in Daytona Beach Shores, Fl / Headline Surfer®Flagler Avenue beach cam in New Smyrna Beach, FL / Headline Surfer®Graphics images for Headline Surfer® /
At far left is an online snapshot of the Dunlawton Avenue beach approach in Daytona Beach Shores from a Volusia County beach cam.
Cars are more visible at the Dunlawton locale here than in the inset cam snapshot from the Flagler Avenue beach approach in New Smyrna Beach. That's because cars are not allowed to park on the beach in front of the municipal lot above that is adjacent to the Flagler Avenue ramp because a slice of it facing the beach also is considered a park with grills, picnic tables and bathrooms. Vehicular traffic is far greater at the NSB locale, regardless. There are a lot more people visible in the NSB cam snapshot as well, demonstrating the popularity of this stretch of beach.
 

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Volusia County beach patrol personnel flew the "yellow flag" Saturday on 49 miles of beaches in Ormond, Daytona, Daytona Beach Shores, Ponce Inlet and New Smyrna.

"We rescued 8 people out of the ocean without incident," Beach Safety Ocean Rescue Capt. Tamra Marris wrote in an end-of-the-day email summary to Headline Surfer® and other Central Florida media outlets. "A great Saturday on the beach. We had moderate crowds and no major issues."

Marris did not indicate where Saturday's 11 rescues occurred nor did she say how many beach safety lifeguards or cops were deployed, something the internet newspaper has consistently asked for in the wake of five drownings -- four since Memorial Day weekend -- and since an an 11-year-old Georgia boy was struck by a lightning bolt while fishing in knee-deep water with his dad in Daytona Beach Shores on June 9. 

There were no lifeguards or beach cops around for four of the drownings nor were there any of either to tend to the boy, Bowen Tyre, who remains in serious condition at Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando.

Bowen Tyre, 11, of Georgia, was struck by a lightning bolt in Daytona Beach Shores, FL on June 9 / Headline Surfer®Bowen Tyre, 11 of Georgia, remains in serious condition at Arnold Palmer Hosoital in Orlando since he was struck by  lightning bolt while fishing with his dad in Daytona Beach Shores on June 9. There were no Volusia County lifeguards nor were there any beach patrol personnel anywhere near the near-fatal incident.

Volusia County Beach Safety Ocean Rescue Capt. Tamra Marris did not indicate where Saturday's 11 rescues occurred nor did she say how many beach safety lifeguards or cops were deployed, something the internet newspaper has consistently asked for in the wake of five drownings -- four since Memorial Day weekend -- and since an 11-year-old Georgia boy was struck by a lightning bolt while fishing in knee-deep water with his dad in Daytona Beach Shores on June 9. There were no lifeguards or beach cops around for four of the drownings nor were there any of either to tend to the boy, Bowen Tyre, who remains in serious condition at Arnold Palmer Hospital in Orlando. 

The lightning bolt struck the child on top of his head, knocking him unconscious. A nearby surfer came to his immediate aid, performing CPR -- later credited with saving his life -- before emergency personnel arrived a full 5 minutes after he started compressions.  

It was sunny out at the time when the father and son were fishing and no indication a storm was brewing in that area, though beach personnel have equipment to detect such storm activity as far as 25-30 miles away as well as by monitoring National Weather Service reports for the coastline and further out in the surf.

Henry Frederick Picture

Short Bio

Henry Frederick is publisher of Headline Surfer®, the award-winning 24/7 internet news outlet covering the Daytona Beach-Sanford-Orlando metro area via HeadlineSurfer.com for a decade now. A longtime cops & courts reporter focused on breaking news & investigative reporting, Frederick is among the Sunshine State's most prolific daily news reporters, having amassed dozens of journalism-industry awards in print anddigital platforms. Frederick is enrolled at Full Sail University in Winter Garden, FL, where he's three-fourths through the online Master of Arts program in New Media Journalism. His graduation is in August.