Surfer, 18, bitten on foot by a shark Sunday in New Smyrna Beach

Photo for Headline Surfer / This is a screenshot from a WESH Channel 2 chopper video on this Monday afternoon in the surf off of Daytona Beach showing a shark  near swimmers unaware of its presence near the shoreline before swimming further out into the surf. The shark's presence was reported by the Orlando TV station to Volusia County Beach Safety officials. 
YouTube download / Movie Clips Classic Trailers video / Jaws Official Trailer No - Richard Dreyfuss, Steven Spielberg Movie (1975)... You won't find a great white shark off the Atlantic waters of Florida - certainly not any like the fictional man-eating shark in the vintage movie.
 
By HENHRY FREDERICK
Headline Surfer

NEW SMYRNA BEACH, Fla. -- An 18-year-old surfer from Merritt Island suffered a shark bite to his foot Sunday while surfing in the waves near the South Jetty, Volusia County Beach Safety officials said.

The teen, whose name wasd not immediately available, didn't actually see the shark, but the puncture wound had the markings of a shark bite, a beach safety officer said, adding the teen declined to be transported to the hospital for further treatment.  

Surfing is a draw for surfers near the South Jetty because of the rolling waves, but It's also a spot where spinner- and black tip-sharks, typically 3 to 8 feet in length, are drawn to bait fish. Sunday's shark bite incident was the second of 2019 in Volusia County, both occurring in waters off of New Smyrna Beach.

The waters just south of the South Jetty that juts out between Ponce Inlet and New Smyrna Beach is a draw for surfers because of the rolling waves it produces, but It's also a spot where spinner -- and black tip-sharks -- typically 3 to 10 feet in length, are drawn to bait fish. 

Sunday's shark bite incident was the second of 2019 in Volusia County, both occurring in waters off of New Smyrna Beach, though the earlier shark bite was further down the shoreline.

Shark Attacks in Florida, US, World / Hadline Surfer InfographicThe waters just south of the South Jetty that juts out between Ponce Inlet and New Smyrna Beach is a draw for surfers because of the rolling waves it produces, but It's also a spot where spinner -- and black tip-sharks -- typically 3 to 6 feet in length and 150 pounds -- are drawn to bait fish. 

Sunday's shark bite incident was the second of 2019 in Volusia County, both occurring in waters off of New Smyrna Beach, though the earlier shark bite was further down the shoreline.

A Sanford teen was bitten on the calf by a shark on April 19 while he was wading in waist deep water late Sunday afternoon, April 19.

Matthew Cornell, 19, suffered lacerations in the 7:45 p.m. near the Flagler Avenue beach approach, Capt. Andrew Ethridge has said. Lifeguards treated Cornell on the scene, but he drove himself to the hospital.

Volusia County led the state with four shark attacks of Florida’s total of 16 in 2018, according to the International Shark Attack File based at the University of Florida.

 

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Short Bio

Henry Frederick is publisher of Headline Surfer®, the award-winning 24/7 internet news outlet covering the Daytona Beach-Sanford-Orlando metro area via HeadlineSurfer.com since 2008. A longtime cops & courts reporter focused on breaking news & investigative reporting, Frederick is among the Sunshine State's most prolific daily news reporters, having amassed close to a hundred award-winning byline stories nearly evenly split in print and digital platforms. Frederick earned his Master of Arts in New Media Journalism with academic honors from Full Sail University in Winter Park in February 2019. He was a metro reporter with the Daytona Beach News-Journal for nearly a decade and then served as a city editor for the Taunton Daily Gazette in Taunton, Mass, while maintaining a residence in Central Florida. Prior to moving to Florida, Frederick was a metro reporter for the Rockland Journal-News in West Nyack, NY, for seven years. Headline Surfer was named the Sunshine State's top internet news site by the Florida Press Club in 2018.